IRMCA presents Ken Mulzer, Sr. with the E.B. Rayburn, Jr. Award

INDIANAPOLIS – The Indiana Ready Mixed Concrete Association (IRMCA) presented Ken Mulzer, Sr., Mulzer Crushed Stone, Inc., with its prestigious 2018 E.B. Rayburn, Jr. Award. The award was established to recognize outstanding leadership and innovation in marketing efforts in the ready mixed concrete industry in Indiana and was presented during the recent 2018 IRMCA Short Course Program.

Ken Mulzer, Jr. poses with his father, Ken Mulzer, Sr. after receiving the E.B. Rayburn, Jr. Award.

Ken Mulzer, Sr. is a retired construction materials executive who, alongside his four siblings, helped grow the family aggregate business into an industry powerhouse in the production of crushed stone, sand and gravel, including concrete and asphalt services. The family business got its start in 1935 when his father Arnold and uncles Edgar and Roland formed Mulzer Brothers, a small construction firm. In 1978, the company, led by Arnold, transformed into what is known today as Mulzer Crushed Stone, Inc.

Mulzer Sr. began his career at a young age doing odd jobs around the quarries and concrete plant. He went on to graduate from Valparaiso University with a degree in Business Administration and a minor in Geology before returning home to join the family business. Over the years, Ken has been a staunch advocate for the construction materials industry on the local, state and national levels, he has served as Chairman of the Board of the National Sand, Stone & Gravel Association, been a past President of the Indiana Mineral Aggregates Association, and has held numerous leadership roles in industry and community organizations near and far from his home in Santa Claus, Indiana, which he shares with his wife of 50 years, Andrea (Dee).

“The company and I are extremely proud of my father and the role that he has played in moving the concrete industry forward over the years,” commented Ken Mulzer, Jr., President of Mulzer Crushed Stone, Inc.   “His intuition and foresight of the ever-changing business landscape proved invaluable to our firm and countless others throughout the state.”

The Indiana Ready Mixed Concrete Association (IRMCA) supports and promotes the use of high quality Portland cement concrete in pavements, parking lots, structures and residential construction. The IRMCA provides technical and informational support for its members and their clients. For additional information contact Jerry Larson, executive director, at (317) 733-1902 or see:


Mulzer Crushed Stone, Inc. Hits Million Hour Safety Mark

Mulzer Crushed Stone announced today that employees have completed 1.4 Million work hours without incurring an occupational injury or illness that resulted in days away from work or death.  “This momentous milestone is being celebrated company-wide and is a testament to the safety driven goals put in place by our management and executed by our entire team, making Mulzer Crushed Stone Safety a way of life,” commented President Ken Mulzer, Jr.

Creating a culture of safety with milestone results in a construction materials business is not always an easy road to navigate, but Mulzer Crushed Stone has a team of Safety Professionals who are known around the workplace for creating fun, innovative programs and techniques to train and educate employees on all things safety.  For example, our Team has found that a little competition can go a long way in classroom training over topics that can often be somewhat lackluster.  Who doesn’t love a good video game or quiz contest against your co-workers?

Other unique aspects to the Safety Program include designated equipment specific training employees who instruct, monitor and test new employees to verify that they are ready to work independently.

“If you think about it, quarry, asphalt and concrete operations can be highly dangerous work for a multitude of reasons, but our employees take the topic serious and make safety priority #1,” Mulzer, Jr. added.  “They don’t get complacent. We have 1.4 Million hours of zero lost time to prove it and we congratulate each and every one of them on this significant achievement.”

To further illustrate the 100% safety culture mindset, employees have been encouraged to share their safe practices in action via social media with the #MulzerSafetyMillion.

IMMEP Scholarship Applications Due March 31, 2017

The Indiana Mining & Mineral Education Program (IMMEP) believes that education is an important part of being successful in a life-long career. IMMEP wants to help students interested in mining related careers achieve educational goals without financial road blocks.  Aiding in this program objective, IMMEP will be awarding up to six (6) $2,500 scholarships this spring.

The purpose of the IMMEP Scholarship Program is twofold, (1) Strengthen the Indiana aggregates industry by promoting careers in the industry and supporting education of individuals seeking a career in the aggregates industry, and (2) Establish relationships with institutions of higher learning providing education supporting careers in the aggregates industry.

IMMEP is currently accepting applications online at  The application deadline is March 31, 2017.  Applications must be submitted online through the web form at


Gengelbach Named 2017-18 AEMP Chairman

The following article by G.C. Skipper was featured in the Spring 2017 edition of Equipment Manager, the Official Publication of the Association of Equipment Management Professionals. 

Don Gengelbach’s career that led to his earning a CEM and, most recently, being named AEMP’s chairman for 2017, started when he was a youngster working as a farm hand in Indiana.

As he begins his term as AEMP chairman, Gengelbach also continues his responsibilities as equipment manager for Mulzer Crushed Stone, Inc. (MCS), a company headquartered in Tell City, Ind.  During his 35 years there, he has expanded, improved, and developed the different skills required to succeed with each of his promotions.  He started at MCS as a welder unti la diesel mechanic position became open.  After that, he became a quarry production supervisor, and then assumed the responsibilities of fleet manager for the company.

With MCS, he has learned how to recruit new talent, and, more importantly perhaps, he learned where to find the skills required from his early days of working in the shop.

“Although technicians were plentiful in 2000, MCS had already established a program to find future employees,” Gengelbach says.  “They dipped into a pool of candidates who wanted not just a job, but a career.  The recruitment program, which was set up prior to 2000, works closely with area local educators to get high schoolers introduced to the company’s maintenance operation.

“We evaluate the students and help them through school by setting up a scholarship program to help them through their educational process,” Gengelbach says. “When they graduated, we hired them.”

In recent years, MCS has expanded the program to include welders and electricians.  Gengelbach says the company is also communicating with more age groups.

It’s not surprising, then, that the focus of his incoming AEMP tenure reaches across three fronts.

“I want to continue with a strategic plan that focuses on safety, technology, and workforce developement, wiht a little bit more emphasis on developing the workforce.  All three of my priorities flow into the very reason why AEMP was formed – namely, education.  Right from the beginning, education was one of the most important drivers behind creating the association,” he says.

Noting that the existing Workforce Development Committee, which is only one year old, “is off to a great start” communicating with training centers, trade schools, and community colleges to encourage students to look beyond today’s obvious career paths, he would like to see it develop a structured career path.  He says more and more graduates will discover career choices that they might not know about in the heavy equipment industry.

Gengelbach, who served on the Online Education Committee, intends to push forward with aggressive efforts to get more AEMP members involved in committees.

Career-wise, he knows firsthand what the industry has to offer.  After high school, he enrolled in a trade school to learn to be a diesel mechanic.  his experience and background repairing farm equipment proved to be a strong foundation to build on, Gengelbach says.

His first supervisory role at MCS came during the late 1980s when he left “mechanic row” and moved to a new quarry that MCS had acquired.  That meant a location change, but he didn’t hesitate.  He moved about 90 miles from Perry County, Ind., to Clark County, Ind.

“that put me into a position to become production supervisor of that quarry,” he says.  Immediately, Gengelbach, with others, tackled major modifications to the quarry itself, making sure the new facility lived up to MCS’s standards.

It was toward the end of the modification process that he was asked to become the quarry’s product supervisor.  In 2000, he was offered an opportunity to move back into maintenance. He accepted, knowing he had to learn yet another set of additional skills to handle the duties of equipment manager.

But to succeed in his climb up the career ladder meant much more than simply on-the-job training.  MCS, he says, has always encouraged its maintenance employees to become active participants at the community, regional, and national levels by joining associations and groups that could help them improve and better understand their jobs, among other things.  “The company is a strong supporter of AEMP,” he says.

He heard about AEMP through a former MCS manger and started attending local chapter meetings.  Impressed with the group and how it could impact his career in a positive way, he became an AEMP member in 2005-2006.

“I made that decision based on my desire to learn and grow in the industry,” he says, “as well as furthering my education on how to better manage fleets.”

Among the benefits that AEMP membership has given him is how to use his own experience, combined with intense study and preparation, to become an AEMP Certified Equipment Manager.  Another comes from attending the conferences, where attendees are taught ways to do the job more efficiently and ideas are suggested for consideration to help make the job easier and more professional.  That not only is true for the meetings, panel discussions, and sessions themselves, but also for the meaningful takeaways from discussions with other members.

Despite the wide spectrum of challenges, Gengelbach says he has found solutions that he can apply to his own operation.

“The first thing that comes to mind is that we all have to manage life cycles,” he says.  “Also, we all use technology to identify the different types of equipment in our fleets.  Everyone, for example, has to set up budgets and make decision on whether to keep equipment or replace it.

“In my situation, I think my job is easier.  Ninety-nine percent of the time I know where my equipment is.  Unlike big fleets, for instance, I don’t have to worry about tracking and locating equipment all over the United States.  I would think huge global organizations have a bigger challenge tracking their equipment and identifying what country it’s in.  In certain ways, I don’t have that headache.”

With rapidly changing developments in each of the three fronts, he feels that sticking with AEMP’s founding principle-education-is the best approach when dealing with things to come. EM

Peters Named “Miner of the Year” by IMAA

Brian Peters, 2016 Miner of the Year

Indiana Mineral Aggregates Association (IMAA) has named Mulzer Crushed Stone, Inc. Environmental Health & Safety Director Brian Peters the organization’s 2016 Miner of the Year.

Nominations for the “Miner of the Year” Award come from Indiana Mineral Aggregates Association members. Individuals nominated for the award exemplify the very best in their profession and continually bring credit to the industry and their community.  Selection criteria for this award include significant contributions to the aggregates industry by providing a safe working environment; being innovative in problem solving; demonstrating a concern for the environment; and contributing to the betterment of their local community.

Congratulations to Brian on receiving this prestigious commendation and the efforts he has dedicated to help create a safe working environment at our company, his continuous concern for the environment we live and operate in and the countless hours he and his family devote to the prosperity of their local community.